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Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
education and for education. if government does that and create some certainty, tell us what it will be. with respect to health care costs and energy costs. and then i think it will create the conditions under which businesses will be able to create a renaissance of american competitors. i think that is a brilliant agenda. i think we have agreed that as the distinguished alumnus of harvard said washington as a town with northern charm and southern efficiency. let's assume we go through the fiscal cliff. immigration, corporate tax reform, and investments. emigration, you're not doing the dramatic. vietor due to comprehensive immigration but we did not have a chance to do it. both wings cayman decided it would sabotage it. maybe republicans learned the lesson but i am not sure how much of a lesson. the way that was financed was through the corporate tax increase but there -- that had people on both sides will in to work with the white house and congress. when you talk about infrastructure spending and investments in things we have done with nih, all the talk now is about death. >-- how do
progress forum titled investing in the future, higher education, innovation and american competitiveness. this is 40 minutes. >> it is my great privilege to introduce gene sperling, director of the white house national economic council and assistant the president for economic policy. gene sperling also is a former senior fellow at the center for american progress, pro-growth progressive. and the connection between innovation, education, ensuring we have an economy that works for everyone. i want to say having served in the administration, there is no one in the administration who is more focused on america's long-term competitiveness, short term competitiveness, midterm competitiveness, when the president is talking about issues which are critical to him, america maintains its edges in the global economy, and all of its citizens to students to people dreaming about being the next generation of innovators, policies that helped achieve that. higher education k-12, insuring universities are still leading and citizenry is well s was sub human capital, not the best term. and achieving their d
competitiveness to education. the new number one in most cases, a scandinavian country. what is the secret sauce? we'll dig into it. >>> but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here's something president obama could probably do by himself that would be a single accomplish money of the his presidency. end the war on tar rohr. for the first time since 9/11 an official has raised the prospect. johnson said in a speech to the oxford last week as the battle against al qaeda continues, there will be come a tipping point at which so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda and its affiliates have been killed or captured such that as al qaeda as wi know it has been effectively destroyed. at that point, he says, our efforts should no longer be considered an armed conflict. you might not realize it, but we're still living in a state of war. this is the longest since the civil war, world war i, world war ii. it grants the president and federal government extraordinary authorities, effectively extends civil liberties for anyone the gov
to education, the new number one in most cases a scandinavian country, what is the credit sauce? we'll dig into it. but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here is something president obama could do probably by himself that would be a single accomplishment of his presidency, end the war on terror. for the first time since 9/11, an administration official has raised this prospect. said in a speech to the oxford union last week, that as the battle against al qaeda continues, there will be come a tipping point as so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda have killed or captures such as al qaeda as we know it has been effectively destroyed. our efforts should no lo loaninger -- this is the longest period that the united states has lived in such a situation. longer than the civil war, world war i, world war ii, it grants the government extraordinary authorities and effectively suspends civil liberties for anyone the government deems the minute and also keeps us at a permanent war feeting in all kinds of ways, endsing thi
of the pie, transportation infrastructure. 2% makes up education. 2% for science and medical research and 1% for nonsecurity international. 4% all other. that is break down of the federal budget. >> we will hear from white house spokesman jay carney coming up in half an hour. the briefing at 1:00 eastern live here on c-span2. up until then more from this morning's "washington journal" focus on domestic program cuts. >> host: domestic spending cuts is on the table for the fiscal cliff talks. two different perspectives for you here. isabel sawhill, brookings institution. brookings center on children and families. james capretta ethics and public policy center and visiting scholar at aei. let me begin with you. are these potential domestic cuts under sequestration devastating or manageable? >> guest: somewhere in between. not a good idea. they would be very deep cuts, you know, an 8% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world, no? >> host: what do you mean by that? >>
-to-day basis. the degree to which this library is a model of educating young people is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the mag entity candidate fundraising ability. john, thank you for your work. [applause] i hope all of you will join me and keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country and we all cherish her as she continued to play a role at the library. i could come here and not mention nancy for at least a moment. i also want to say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years have been mayor of san diego to u.s. senator, to governor to a leader and a variety of ways. and the tequila scrape people who represent a willingness to serve their state in an important way. it's always engaged when you rub there. thank you poker serving the country. it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i did maybe with us, but were thrilled to have you. we have an american legacy book tour. our very fond of the library as you know someone made a movie called ronald rea
in the last week alone. better tools, a better education, that most basic tool, a desk, a place to sit, a place to read, a place to learn. since i partnered with unicef with the k.i.n.d. fund, we have raised $4,734,944. you have filled me with awe each year and i am getting hesitant to tell you how much we have raised because it might sound like we have all the money we need. we don't. if i could bring you with me to see schools without a single desk, you would know that we need every desk we can possibly pay for. every one. and at the pace we're going, more r we're more than a generation alone for providing desks for every classroom in malawi. i will be asking for your help for kids in need of desks. tonight, i want to introduce a new option you will have in contributing to the can k.i.n.d. fund and that is a tuition program i've been working on with unicef for over a year now. some of the better schools in malawi charge a tuition, a small tuition, which means that some of the student who would thrive in those schools cannot attend those schools. it's especially difficult for girls to
. >> is our education system outdated? >> no. >> our union advocacy, is that outdated, how they go about fighting for it? i don't know. that question was put on the table. whether factories are shut, that means jobs have left. if you look at wages enjoyed by workers in right-to-work states, i think it should be put on the table. where do they fare? i have not done the analysis so it's hard to say. >> it's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do
can't. >> you can't, you shouldn't. >> right. >> when you start slashing education, when you start slashing r&d, transportation -- >> it's over. >> -- what you're doing is, you're slashing about 3%, 4% of the budget. and you're leaving the parts of the budget that blow a hole in the deficit and destroy this economy over the next 20 years. >> by the way, we won't go over the cliff for all the reasons we're talking about. even if we do, my friends on the street tell me, it's not a disaster. it's baked in. because we're going to get it done even after the fact. so you're talking about a few points in the market. >>> we're just moments away, joe and i will be removing -- >> oh, no! there it is! >> ow! >> it's all for a great cause. >> i don't know if it's that good. >> i don't know. is this going to be good television or kind of yucky? okay. we'll be right back. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never takin
know this better than i do, whether it's immigration, education, voter suppression, what the leadership of the party has done is say on immigration, you know, you got -- we want deportation. when it talks about education, it's talking about not funding it anymore. when they talk about voter suppression, they deny people the right to vote in a civil manner -- >> but you grew up in this party. it has been a party tough on immigration before, hasn't it? hasn't it been a party on a number of the issues you mentioned before? before recently. when is the big -- when do you think the republican party in your terms broke bad? when did it start to be a party you couldn't be comfortably a member of anymore as governor or as a political person at all? >> i think it started several years ago, maybe three, two, three years ago. i left the party two years ago and became an independent. and i did so because of the fact that, you know, on all of those issues it just wasn't comfortable for me to be there anymore. i mean, you know, everybody has the right to be a member of whatever party they want and i
was educate latino voters, educationing them on how to vote and how to vote in arizona because we have a mail-in ballot process and a voter i.d. law in place so a lot of organizations were educate latino voters, it may be easier to sign up on the mail-in list so you don't have to deal with identification if you don't have the proper i.d. and choose to vote in person. i think that explains why there were so many mail-in ballots cast in the general election in 2012. >> i want to get back to the senate race but stick with the voter i.d. requirements. talk about the restrictions, what exactly the requirements are, and in particular there's been this discussion at the national level about republicans are using voter i.d. requirements to tamp down on voter turnout from certain areas. what are the concerns? how is the latino population-latino voters in arizona -- how are they dealing with that? are there problems? is there going to be a battle over trying to tight 'the voter i.d. requirements? is it a photo i.d. requirement? >> really quickly. arizona's voter i.d. law was put -- voted on by the citi
talk about education, they defund it. talk about voter suppression, they deny voting to people, and i just can't embrace that anymore and be true to myself. >> let me read some of your own quotes back to you. hard to be more conservative than i am on the issues. back on 2009. pro life, pro gun, pro family, i'm anti tax. have you changed on those four specific things? >> no, i'm not saying that at all. i'm pro life, but i don't believe in imposing my will on other people. i believe people should support and protect the second amendment. i believe raising taxes isn't something anybody wants to do. certainly i never wanted to do it as a legislator or as governor. i believe in public safety. i believe in protecting the environment. i live in florida, the most beautiful state in the country in my humble opinion. these things i have always believed in. education, ethics, the environment, protecting the economy, and fighting for people. >> let's focus on taxes for a moment. in the fiscal cliff debate, tax is a big part of that. where do you stand on that if you are anti tax? >> anti tax, but
schoolteacher who spent the better part of 40 years educating our children. she deserves and needs to e retire next year. she's 64. i'm here for darlene, a -- [inaudible] native who receives her life saving blood pressure medication through medicare part d. i'm here for alice, an african-american grandmother of ten who receives treatment for her diabetes through medicaid. this woman worked her whole life in the hotel industry. i'm here for my friend mark who owns a small business. he's a construction manager. >> ma'am, ma'am, i'm going to ask you to sit down so we can have this discussion. >> i'm happy to leave -- [inaudible] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> we're gonna vote -- [inaudible] the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! >> okay. i'm gonna take a moment to try to, um, talk, and we'll see if it works. i don't know if other people are here. but i actually think that what we just saw is, um, a true reflection of how hard what we're trying to do is. i'm real
security and education and you want to rein in the entitlement programs. action reform an entitlement reform -- we are not fixing entitlements, cutting core government functions. host: we have been john on the phone on the republican line from maryland. caller: good morning. i don't hear anybody talking about the real problem that we have in the united states. you cannot go into a store in the united states and buy american products. toyou don't put the people work, you cannot pay taxes. fore got men in jail murdering 15 or 20 people and we feed and clothe them all year. i don't understand it. host: thank you for the call. take a look of the budget and draw a say eie. where does the money go? guest: most of the money are the things that have put in place where you get benefits regardless, social security, medicare, and medicaid. national security and basic spending on the fans an annual preparations for education, health, and the upper structure are a small fraction. we are seeing the baby boomers retire and we have seen health care spending rise. that combination is very powerful on
no leadership capable of making a deal. you cannot start with the education of little kids, teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for, and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. there are a lot of conditions for this to work. it cannot happen overnight. as i said, part of the problem is that have created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> express some realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. we'll be back essentially to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that? it is semi-democratic. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as to apply them, there will be certain -- circumstances were some send potential compromise is required, the new approach of these problems that way. if you have very good intelligence, you understand better what is going on within t
to have a chance to get to the middle class, the growth and educational opportunities, most people, the vast majority of americans would rather have a job that pays more than a welfare check. i believe that. i know that to be true. we have answers for that. we should pursue them. >>neil: looking at the 2016 race, gingrich got headlines when he said the present cop of potential candidate would have a tough time against a possible hillary clinton democratic nominee, that the democrats run the table. what do you maybe 1/2? >>guest: all i can say, four years is a very, very long time, you think back four years ago and how different the world looks, there will be two or three things that happen between now and then and it will change the dynamic. what i am focused on is making sure for the brad of the number of americans possible, limited government and free enterprise, the principles that is built our country, one that is being sold to and appealed to the broadest number of americans. we have great principles to sell and we need to apply our principles of conservative to the challenges
, while still being automobile to invest in things -- able to invest in things like education and research and development that are important to our growth, and if we're going to protect middle-class families, then we're going to have to have higher rates for the wealthiest americans, folks like me. >> white house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. nice to have you with us. >> good to see you. >> what's the next move for republicans, dan? >> well, you know, i think republicans are in a difficult spot here. one of the sticking points is this $800 billion in new tax revenue. this is part of speaker john boehner's proposal. it doesn't call for more taxes on the wealthy, but it does call for eliminating some deductions, closing loopholes. nonetheless, there are some conservatives who are pushing back on this. they think that this will hurt job growth and these are conservatives who are backed by the tea party. they're outright rejecting it. what you're seeing here developing is that republicans are not speaking with one voice. >> republicans should not be con
schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. sponsored report gave a full endorsement that more liquid natural gas exports will help our economy and more shale oil and gas production will make us energy independent. question, will the epa keep its snout out of this great breakthrough energy process? here now to tell us is john hoffmeister. john, what's this take on the liquefied natural gas? i didn't even know there were constraints on their exports. >> well, the department of energy has to grant permits to economies that would seek to export natural gas. the study that came out was not an endorsement by the department energy, not yet. it was a third-party report analyzing the situation. it will now go into public discussion. the department of energy hasn't really taken a position yet opt report. but here's the reality. this is buried treasure, larry, this is buried treasure in this country, natural gas, i mean, that could be the stimulus that this economy has been loo
and riding in particular but educated people and become more discriminating, become more effective judges of what makes something good. people buy books, this is a book loving community and the institute has done all loss and enhanced that. on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite ridge. we are any feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writers institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, in columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond, the writers colony -- the writers' groups in hudson, n.y. east and west into western massachusetts, west to syracuse. that is the audience, sort of circumference we work with so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connection to henry james and herman melville or bret harte or a little bit further eas
a basic feeling of fairness. she is an extraordinary person. she's certainly well educated and has really served our nation well as ambassador to the united nations. >> all right. we'll leave it there. senator durbin, congressman mccarthy, thank you very much. >> thank you for having us. >>> coming up, the showdown over the debt. who wins and who loses? including why one prominent republican observer i talked to this week says that the president actually wants to go over the cliff. who was it? what did he mean? find out after the break. former speaker newt gingrich. julianna goldman. helene cooper of "the new york times" is back. "the washington post's" bob woodward. and msnbc's lawrence o'donnell. all coming up after the break. >>> "meet the press" is brought to you by the boeing company. >>> coming up here, as hillary clinton prepares to step down as secretary of state, her popularity has soared to an all-time high. according to a new poll out this week, 66% view the country's top diplomat favorably, up from 44% in 2008. what does that mean for her future? that's one of washington's fav
is the most important thing, my job, the economy, educating my children, crime. before the latino audiences, political audiences will listen to you as a candidate. you first cannot be mean, nasty, spirited towards immigrants. if you are they simply shut you off. so i think the problem that the republicans had is latinos said you're being so unfair, you're being so anti-immigrant, we feel personally offended by that and plus it is part of our core value. they just don't listen, so i think it was critical to the republican message that people weren't listening, they weren't buying in because they won't tune in if you're in that mean. >> the "wall street journal" is reporting congressional republicans are laying the groundwork for an immigration bill and raising money for gop lawmakers who support it and saying a bipartisan group in the house has been meeting secretly since 2009 to craft an immigration bill and they have legislation ready to go. what do you know about that legislation? >> here's what i know. i'm going to be seeing mr. l labrador this afternoon, republican from idaho sitting do
to go. i think it is so important that the younger people be educated and it really opened his eyes to see what the real world was like and he was going to come back and report it to his history class today in high school. >> stephanie: wow. >> caller: i just think it is so great. i think we need more of that. we need more education out there as to how good unions are. >> stephanie: you have a -- obviously a proud history in michigan and now you know what else, you have, a $100 gift code! flowers gift code. >> you're the best call of the day, carol. >> stephanie: and you're union and you're from michigan. hang on. >> wow! >> travis will get your info. >> stephanie: for the perfect holiday gift, go to proflowers.com, enter the promo code stephanie. there you go. okay. tony in north carolina. hey, tony, welcome. >> how you doing stephanie? >> stephanie: good, go ahead. >> caller: this president needs to start acting like ronald reagan -- i know who ronald reagan is supposed to be but who is tip o'neil supposed
done from immigration to energy, to education, and you've got to get through this one. not to mention what we're about to get to on foreign policy issues which will serve as a backdrop for the remainder of the term. you've got to get this done to get over that hump. you've got to think the president's focused on it which is why i remain optimistic that it may get done december 20th. >> on the sunday talk shows that you're talking about, let's just strip it down. a man in negotiations does not say to another man, you're going to cave. do you say that to another man in negotiations? and you think you're going to get him to cave? >> no, sloulgabsolutely not. >> oh, please, this is all about men. come on. first of all, a woman would never think saying that because they would lactually be much moe reasonable, and something would actually get done. but if you're going to negotiate as men, you're going to have to find a way to strategically make the other side feel whole while not destroying your own ego at the same time. i didn't understand when i watched the treasury secretary saying oh, y
in certain social media environments or play games. it could be learning. it could be education. the thing you don't want to do is take your eye off the ball to let your children start downloading things you're unaware of or interacting which is not consistent where they should be tracked especially the location. that is the biggest area of concern. being able to track their location precisely. alisyn: sure. that is the thing that sends a schiffer down parents spines. we know there are predators out there. >> yes. alisyn: lawrence, aren't their laws against tracking whereabouts of kids under 18 years old? >> well there are laws that apply to mobile applications but what we're seeing here is growing pains in the industry. we saw some of the same debates when we first started talking about the use of cookies in internet advertising and tracking the usage of internet consumers and here the mobile application developers are trying to strike a proper balance between the convenience of the technology and the privacy rights involved. and the ftc has recently released a report that encourages the
happen to have a the lot of family members in education. the stories about what the teachers union demands of teachers is quite shocking. megyn: thanks for being here. before he lived in the white house former president ronald reagan lived in illinois. now there are plans to bulldoze one of his childhood homes. >> new word out of illinois that ronald reagan's childhood home is about to get demolished. the university of chicago owns the land now and it's about to go under the bulldozer. critics say the decision is being driven by politics. trace gallagher live in our west coast newsroom with more. >> reporter: president reagan lived the first 21 years of his life in illinois. in 1915, ronald reagan's family moved in there. young dutch was 4 years old. the building is owned by the university of chicago and they want to raze it to make a parking lot. they turned down the request to make it an architectural preservation. they say it shaped the president's character and it was the place his first memories were made and this should be turned into a museum. that's turning on deaf ears at
something you can do yourself, no matter your age, education, or your experience. you can literally earn money on your own computer from the your own kitchen table 24/7. if you are sick of living paycheck to paycheck worried about job security or retirement, no sense complaining about it. if you are looking to earn extra income from home part-time or full-time, here is your opportunity, go to incomeathome.com. they are adding my listeners in recordners, giving away a thousand bucks to somebody for checking them out. visit incomeathome.com. incomeathome.com. peter? >> peter: yes, indeed tweeting separates@bp show, neil king, our friend from the "wall street journal." >>. >> up early this morning. >> in his jogging outfit. >> out for a run. neil responding to our questions about what you should tell the president today. you should say good evening. should i stand to the right or left of you, smile and your 15 seconds is over. >> bill: has obviously been through that line several times. >> exactly. he is hard to miss. 8 feet tall. >> taller than michelle ob
in a different field in education. states that demonstrated the most comprehensive and promising reform plan win a greater portion in that model. the fast voting act would inspire election reform. this bill authorizes a federal program that would award grants based on how well states improve access to the ballot in at least nine different ways. through flexible registration opportunities, including same-day registration. through early voting, at a minimum nine of the ten calendar days preceding an election. through what's called no-excuse absentee voting. assistance to voters who don't speak english or have disabilities or visual impairments. effective access to voting for members of our armed services. formal training to election officials, including state and county administrators and volunteers. audited and reduced waiting times at the poorest-performing polling stations. and as we learned given that sandy, super storm sandy kourbgd just a few -- occurred just a few days close to the election, contingency plans for voting in the event of natural or other disaster that compels the delay of an
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Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)